Monocle-Wearing Hipsters, Glassholes & Vine Lead To The ‘Stupidification Of Society’

Toronto-based Capital C is out with a couple of videos that were created for TEDxColumbiaSIPA, which took place last week . Each video takes a look at the “stupidification of society” brought about by social media’s penchant for encouraging ever shorter, less informative and downright stupid content as opposed to more thoughtful content. The first […]

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Toronto-based Capital C is out with a couple of videos that were created for TEDxColumbiaSIPA, which took place last week . Each video takes a look at the “stupidification of society” brought about by social media’s penchant for encouraging ever shorter, less informative and downright stupid content as opposed to more thoughtful content.

The first video, The Vine Effect, ponders what would happen if 6-second sound bites became the order of the day instead of engaging, immersive, longer-format content. A second video, The Glass Era, takes an ironic look at what would occur if people stopped seeking out interesting content and became satisfied with information that was being fed to them.

The videos aim to align with the mission of TED and TEDx: Ideas Worth Spreading and take a futuristic look at what would happen if current social media and technology trends usurped the desire for people to engage with the kind of thought-provoking content that TED and TEDx conferences deliver.

Except, of course, TED talks are only 18 minutes long. Sure, that’s longer than 6 seconds and more intellectual than a Glasshole taking a picture of himself in the shower but, hey, we guess 18 minutes is better than 6 seconds. And it may truly prevent us from ending up in that Idiocracy movie.


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Steve Hall
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Steve Hall is a marketing professional, publisher, writer, community manager, photographer and all-around lover of advertising.

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