Adobe rains down announcements for its Experience Cloud

At the Adobe Summit last week: a new unified customer profile, the general launch of the Device Co-Op, analytics for streaming audio and new AI services

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Adobe offered a deluge of announcements about its Experience Cloud last week at its annual Summit in Las Vegas.

Perhaps the most far-reaching one was the launch of a new, unified customer profile called the Experience Cloud Profile, combining customer data from customer relationship management systems, as well as from online behavior, device use and ad exposure. It sounds like a Customer Data Platform, a marketer-accessible and centralized hub of customer and prospect data. As Vice President of Platform Engineering Anjul Bhambhri noted in a blog post:

What data does this profile have? It can ingest data from various enterprise repositories including first-party data as well [as] any third-party data. This data may consist of CRM data, ecommerce transactions, offline transactions, loyalty program data, behavioral data from mobile, web or emails, and social interaction data.

How do we stitch this data? Each data source has its own notion of identity of a customer for each record. These identities need to be matched against each other. For first-party data, this process has various names such as de-duplication, data merger, or survivorship. In [the] case of online behavioral data records the identities are often anonymous cookies and require cookie-matching techniques. Mobile and IoT have their own notion of identities such as device IDs. Identity resolution needs to use deterministic as well probabilistic algorithms for matching. The interconnect of all these identities can be modeled as an identity graph.

Coming from a wide variety of sources, the data will be unified through the use of Adobe’s Experience Data Models, or XDM, so it can be used throughout the Cloud platform.

The unification will also be helped by the general availability of the Adobe Device Co-Op, first announced in 2016. Through it, brands can share anonymous consumer data so that a device graph — User 123 owns this laptop, smartphone and tablet — can be understood and targeted.

Adobe Analytics can now track streaming audio, which the company said marks the first time analytics is offered for both online and offline audio, the latter for downloadable podcasts and audiobooks.

Sensei Services, Perfect Path

The Advertising Cloud now features a new Creative component that can immediately access material generated in Creative Cloud.

Sensei services are becoming available via APIs, as Adobe joins the AI-on-demand trend. The first Sensei service, available in preview and utilizing prebuilt algorithms, helps developers speed up content delivery and personalization, such as with automated image tagging and cropping. Upcoming Sensei services will tackle attribution, customer journeys and profiles.

To help marketing teams better use the Experience Cloud, a new superhero-sounding Experience League will utilize a community of experts in a learning environment that employs step-by-step guides.

There were also a variety of announcements pointing to future directions for the company.

Adobe and chipmaker NVIDIA, which have worked together for more than a decade, announced a new partnership that will optimize Adobe’s Sensei AI layer for NVIDIA GPU chips. Separately, a new Data Science Workspace will allow developers to build custom data models on the Adobe Cloud Platform.

And there were Sneak Peeks into projects that Adobe is developing. In Perfect Path, Sensei maps out the best customer journey for each individual, after first determining every possible journey.

There are also new methods for catching bot fraud by using Adobe analytical data to better understand how real humans act, and Video Ad AI gives recommendations on how to improve online video performance, based on the performance of similar clips.

Project “Launch It” is employing AI and natural language processing to better automate tag management, and Master Plan will provide AI-powered recommendations on which assets would best be sent through which channels in a given campaign.

Adobe Summit Roglov

Adobe offered a deluge of announcements about its Experience Cloud last week at its annual Summit in Las Vegas.

Perhaps the most far-reaching one was the launch of a new, unified customer profile called the Experience Cloud Profile, combining customer data from customer relationship management systems, as well as from online behavior, device use and ad exposure. It sounds like a Customer Data Platform, a marketer-accessible and centralized hub of customer and prospect data. As Vice President of Platform Engineering Anjul Bhambhri noted in a blog post:

What data does this profile have? It can ingest data from various enterprise repositories including first-party data as well [as] any third-party data. This data may consist of CRM data, ecommerce transactions, offline transactions, loyalty program data, behavioral data from mobile, web or emails, and social interaction data.

How do we stitch this data? Each data source has its own notion of identity of a customer for each record. These identities need to be matched against each other. For first-party data, this process has various names such as de-duplication, data merger, or survivorship. In [the] case of online behavioral data records the identities are often anonymous cookies and require cookie-matching techniques. Mobile and IoT have their own notion of identities such as device IDs. Identity resolution needs to use deterministic as well probabilistic algorithms for matching. The interconnect of all these identities can be modeled as an identity graph.

Coming from a wide variety of sources, the data will be unified through the use of Adobe’s Experience Data Models, or XDM, so it can be used throughout the Cloud platform.

The unification will also be helped by the general availability of the Adobe Device Co-Op, first announced in 2016. Through it, brands can share anonymous consumer data so that a device graph — User 123 owns this laptop, smartphone and tablet — can be understood and targeted.

Adobe Analytics can now track streaming audio, which the company said marks the first time analytics is offered for both online and offline audio, the latter for downloadable podcasts and audiobooks.

Sensei Services, Perfect Path

The Advertising Cloud now features a new Creative component that can immediately access material generated in Creative Cloud.

Sensei services are becoming available via APIs, as Adobe joins the AI-on-demand trend. The first Sensei service, available in preview and utilizing prebuilt algorithms, helps developers speed up content delivery and personalization, such as with automated image tagging and cropping. Upcoming Sensei services will tackle attribution, customer journeys and profiles.

To help marketing teams better use the Experience Cloud, a new superhero-sounding Experience League will utilize a community of experts in a learning environment that employs step-by-step guides.

There were also a variety of announcements pointing to future directions for the company.

Adobe and chipmaker NVIDIA, which have worked together for more than a decade, announced a new partnership that will optimize Adobe’s Sensei AI layer for NVIDIA GPU chips. Separately, a new Data Science Workspace will allow developers to build custom data models on the Adobe Cloud Platform.

And there were Sneak Peeks into projects that Adobe is developing. In Perfect Path, Sensei maps out the best customer journey for each individual, after first determining every possible journey.

There are also new methods for catching bot fraud by using Adobe analytical data to better understand how real humans act, and Video Ad AI gives recommendations on how to improve online video performance, based on the performance of similar clips.

Project “Launch It” is employing AI and natural language processing to better automate tag management, and Master Plan will provide AI-powered recommendations on which assets would best be sent through which channels in a given campaign.

Adobe Summit Roglov

Adobe offered a deluge of announcements about its Experience Cloud last week at its annual Summit in Las Vegas.

Perhaps the most far-reaching one was the launch of a new, unified customer profile called the Experience Cloud Profile, combining customer data from customer relationship management systems, as well as from online behavior, device use and ad exposure. It sounds like a Customer Data Platform, a marketer-accessible and centralized hub of customer and prospect data. As Vice President of Platform Engineering Anjul Bhambhri noted in a blog post:

What data does this profile have? It can ingest data from various enterprise repositories including first-party data as well [as] any third-party data. This data may consist of CRM data, ecommerce transactions, offline transactions, loyalty program data, behavioral data from mobile, web or emails, and social interaction data.

How do we stitch this data? Each data source has its own notion of identity of a customer for each record. These identities need to be matched against each other. For first-party data, this process has various names such as de-duplication, data merger, or survivorship. In [the] case of online behavioral data records the identities are often anonymous cookies and require cookie-matching techniques. Mobile and IoT have their own notion of identities such as device IDs. Identity resolution needs to use deterministic as well probabilistic algorithms for matching. The interconnect of all these identities can be modeled as an identity graph.

Coming from a wide variety of sources, the data will be unified through the use of Adobe’s Experience Data Models, or XDM, so it can be used throughout the Cloud platform.

The unification will also be helped by the general availability of the Adobe Device Co-Op, first announced in 2016. Through it, brands can share anonymous consumer data so that a device graph — User 123 owns this laptop, smartphone and tablet — can be understood and targeted.

Adobe Analytics can now track streaming audio, which the company said marks the first time analytics is offered for both online and offline audio, the latter for downloadable podcasts and audiobooks.

Sensei Services, Perfect Path

The Advertising Cloud now features a new Creative component that can immediately access material generated in Creative Cloud.

Sensei services are becoming available via APIs, as Adobe joins the AI-on-demand trend. The first Sensei service, available in preview and utilizing prebuilt algorithms, helps developers speed up content delivery and personalization, such as with automated image tagging and cropping. Upcoming Sensei services will tackle attribution, customer journeys and profiles.

To help marketing teams better use the Experience Cloud, a new superhero-sounding Experience League will utilize a community of experts in a learning environment that employs step-by-step guides.

There were also a variety of announcements pointing to future directions for the company.

Adobe and chipmaker NVIDIA, which have worked together for more than a decade, announced a new partnership that will optimize Adobe’s Sensei AI layer for NVIDIA GPU chips. Separately, a new Data Science Workspace will allow developers to build custom data models on the Adobe Cloud Platform.

And there were Sneak Peeks into projects that Adobe is developing. In Perfect Path, Sensei maps out the best customer journey for each individual, after first determining every possible journey.

There are also new methods for catching bot fraud by using Adobe analytical data to better understand how real humans act, and Video Ad AI gives recommendations on how to improve online video performance, based on the performance of similar clips.

Project “Launch It” is employing AI and natural language processing to better automate tag management, and Master Plan will provide AI-powered recommendations on which assets would best be sent through which channels in a given campaign.


Opinions expressed in this article are those of the guest author and not necessarily MarTech. Staff authors are listed here.


About the author

Barry Levine
Contributor
Barry Levine covers marketing technology for Third Door Media. Previously, he covered this space as a Senior Writer for VentureBeat, and he has written about these and other tech subjects for such publications as CMSWire and NewsFactor. He founded and led the web site/unit at PBS station Thirteen/WNET; worked as an online Senior Producer/writer for Viacom; created a successful interactive game, PLAY IT BY EAR: The First CD Game; founded and led an independent film showcase, CENTER SCREEN, based at Harvard and M.I.T.; and served over five years as a consultant to the M.I.T. Media Lab. You can find him at LinkedIn, and on Twitter at xBarryLevine.

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