With Its Site Down, New York Times Publishes On Twitter & Facebook, Ignores Google+

It’s not unusual for people and companies to turn to social media in times of crisis, but the New York Times did so today with a twist. The paper’s website (and internal email system) was offline for a couple hours and, as you might expect, it turned to Twitter to let readers know about the […]

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newyorktimes-logoIt’s not unusual for people and companies to turn to social media in times of crisis, but the New York Times did so today with a twist.

The paper’s website (and internal email system) was offline for a couple hours and, as you might expect, it turned to Twitter to let readers know about the outage.

The Times also continued to post short news updates to Twitter, but without links since the website was offline.

 

Meanwhile, Times’ writers and reporters were still working on and filing full-length stories. So where did the Times’ turn when it wanted to get those articles published? Facebook. And it told its Twitter followers to visit its Facebook page to start finding full-length articles.

The Times’ began tweeting out news with links again, but the links pointed to the articles published on Facebook.

 

Here’s a screenshot of that article on the Times’ Facebook page (in case the paper decides later to remove it for some reason).

times-facebook

The Times currently has about 3.3 million Facebook fans as I write this. I don’t know how many it had before it started posting full news articles there today, but it was probably a little less.

Meanwhile, over on Google+, where the Times has about 1.5 million followers — nothing to be ashamed of — the Times was completely dead today. It hasn’t posted anything on Google+ since last Friday, August 9th.

nyt-google-plus

It’s reminiscent of last November, when President Barack Obama declared re-election victory on Twitter and Facebook, but not on Google+.



Clearly, Google still has a lot of work to do in getting brands to think of Google+ in times like this when social messaging becomes even more important than on a normal day.


Contributing authors are invited to create content for MarTech and are chosen for their expertise and contribution to the martech community. Our contributors work under the oversight of the editorial staff and contributions are checked for quality and relevance to our readers. The opinions they express are their own.


About the author

Matt McGee
Contributor
Matt McGee joined Third Door Media as a writer/reporter/editor in September 2008. He served as Editor-In-Chief from January 2013 until his departure in July 2017. He can be found on Twitter at @MattMcGee.

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